Apple, Pear & Cranberry Cobbler

Fall and winter scream for baked desserts. Having some of my favorites like pumpkin pie, apple dumplings, cinnamon rolls, and so much more, are always on the list once the weather gets cooler, but you don’t always have to have a dessert that is all that bad for you. I was shocked, and so was the rest of my family, about how delicious and rich this was. After a serving of this we were all satisfied and full. Let’s first talk about the main ingredients in most desserts – sugar, flour, and fat – and see how this dessert, although still being calorie dense, is changed for the healthier.

The Sweetener

Sugar is sugar, is sugar is sugar. Juice, maple syrup, honey, agave, turbinado sugar, date sugar, refined sugar – it’s sugar. However, using unrefined sources for a sweetener like maple syrup, honey, and orange juice still adds sugar but is not from highly processed sources.

With that in mind, in this dessert some of the sugar is from the broken down apples and pears. They are full of natural sugar and by keeping the peels on, you also keep the fiber in the dessert. When cooking there will be a loss of nutrients, but fiber pretty much stays the same which is good when we are talking about a dessert with sugar. Fiber allows the sugar to be absorbed at a slower rate so having something sweet with fiber (like fruit naturally has) does help your body absorb sugar at a slower pace and has more time to use it for energy instead of immediately being dosed with it and storing right away because of the overload. Not to mention the blood sugar spike.

The Flour

This recipe doesn’t use any flour. I only uses oats to create a crunchy topping. So if you are gluten free, make sure to use gluten-free oats. Using oats you can keep it whole food and nothing has been processed and stripped of anything. Plus to fact that we still keep that fiber in there as well.

The Fat

As you may know there are the “good” fats and the “bad” fats. An easy rule of thumb to tell the difference is if the fat/oil is solid at room temperature.

  • For instance butter and shortening is soft, but is still solid at room temperature. This means it is saturated fat or “bad” fat. This is fat that is easily stored and is known to increase LDL cholesterol.
  • Unsaturated fat is liquid at room temperature like olive oil, vegetable oil, and canola oil. These oils are known as the “good” fats. They are easily used in the body and can have some nutritional value because of Omega fatty acids. For instance, olive oil, has been known to decrease “bad” LDL cholesterol when replacing unsaturated fats.

In this recipe I use either canola or vegetable oil in the oat mixture to make sure it doesn’t burn and also creates a crunchy top. You’ll find that all in all, for a baked dessert, there is not a lot of oil added.

 

Apple Pear Cranberry Cobbler
  • Unprocessed source of sugar & is partly from the broken down cooked fruit
  • Oats only, no flour to keep it whole food
  • Unsaturated “good” fat, no “bad” fats

This is still a dessert and calorie dense, but it’s so worth it! Plus the added facts of it being a whole food dessert, easy, low-sodium, and the fat is good unsaturated fats. Enjoy!

Apple, Pear, & Cranberry Cobbler

  • Servings: 12 servings, about 1 cup each
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Ingredients

  • 3 apples, chopped, I use honey crisp apples
  • 2 pears, chopped
  • 12 oz. bag cranberries
  • 4 tbsp cornstarch or arrowroot
  • 4 tbsp water
  • 1 cup Grade A maple syrup
  • 4 tbsp fresh orange juice
  • 4 tsp balsamic vinegar
  • 2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 2 tsp cinnamon
  • OAT CRISP
  • 2 1/2 cups old fashion oats *See note
  • 1/2 cup honey
  • 1/2 cup canola oil
  • 2 tsp cinnamon
  • 2 tsp nutmeg

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. Chop your apples and pears and add to a 9×13 baking pan. No need to prepare the pan with oil or butter before adding anything, leave it dry. Whisk together the corn starch or arrowroot with the water in a small bowl until starch is dissolved. Add to the starch mixture the maple syrup, orange juice, balsamic vinegar, vanilla, and cinnamon. Whisk together. Pour over fruit and gently mix to coat with the wet mixture.
  3. In a medium bowl add oats, honey, canola oil, cinnamon, and nutmeg and stir together. Once mixed together, pour lightly over top of the fruit and spread around to cover the top.
  4. Bake on 350 degrees F for 50-55 minutes or until oats start to brown and the fruit is bubbling on the sides. Your house will smell wonderful!
  5. Let cool for about 5 minutes after taking it out of the oven and serve!

If you are gluten free, make sure to buy gluten free oats. I was not aware of this until a friend had told me about how oats can easily be cross-contaminated with other things that include gluten. Make sure to find gluten-free oats.

Nutritional Information

About 1 cup serving

405 calories | 11.9 g fat | 1.2 g saturated fat | 0 g trans fat | 0 mg cholesterol | 7.5 mg sodium | 70 g carbohydrates | 7 g fiber | 37 g sugar | 4.5 g protein

Macro Sources

69% Carbohydrates | 26% Fat | 5% Protein

Dietary Servings per Portion
  • 1.2 Fruit
  • 1.8 Grain
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Pumpkin Penne with Spinach & Ricotta

Since winter is just around the corner, it’s good to have filling and satisfying recipes at hand that give our immune system a nutrient boost. When most think of pumpkin it’s usually pumpkin pie or a sugary creamy latte they think of first. But pumpkin is good for many things. Since it doesn’t have a strong taste it’s good to add in baking recipes instead of oil to cut down on the fat and calories for instance. Or it’s good to use as a creamy sauce without it being heavy in dairy or fat. This recipe does just that. There are some great benefits to pumpkin as well.

Pureed Pumpkin
  • High in Fiber, 1 cup canned pumpkin has 28% of your daily value of fiber
  • High in Vitamin A, 1 cup canned pumpkin contains 762% Vitamin A, for your eye health
  • Good source of Iron, to oxygenate cells
  • Good Source of Magnesium for your brain, heart, and muscles
  • Good source of Vitamin E for skin, brain, and heart health
  • Low in Sodium / High in Potassium which makes it beneficial for blood pressure control
Cooked Spinach

When foods are cooked it changes the chemistry of them. With spinach there are some added benefits when it’s raw, and other benefits when it’s cooked.

  • Absorb higher levels of Vitamin A
  • Good Source of Vitamin E
  • Good Source of Protein
  • Good Source of Zinc for your immune health
  • Good Source of Calcium for bone health
  • Good Source of Iron for blood health

So this recipe will not only keep your weight down with the amount of fiber, but also help your immune system with the high amounts of vitamin A & E which has powerful antioxidants, and zinc. Great way to use pumpkin and get the health benefits without adding the fat and sugar!

Pumpkin Penne with Spinach & Ricotta

  • Servings: 6 Servings
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Ingredients

  • small amount of olive oil
  • 1 yellow onion, diced
  • 4 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine, optional (use more broth if not using)
  • 4 cups vegetable broth
  • 1/2 cup plain unsweetened yogurt
  • 1 15 oz. can of pumpkin puree (not pumpkin pie mix)
  • 1 large fresh sage leave, minced
  • Salt and Pepper, to taste
  • 1 16 oz. bag whole wheat penne pasta, uncooked
  • 5 oz. bag of baby spinach
  • 1 15 oz. can cannellini beans, drained
  • 1 cup Almond Ricotta, or Regular Ricotta
  • dash of nutmeg, optional

Directions

  1. In a large skillet heat a small amount of oil at medium-high heat. Add onion and cook until translucent. Add in garlic and stir until fragrant, about 1 minute.
  2. Add in the white wine, vegetable broth, yogurt, pumpkin puree, sage, salt, and pepper, and stir to mix together. Bring to a boil. Add the penne pasta and stir to make sure the noodles don’t stick. Lower the heat to medium-low. Cover and let simmer for 8-10 minutes, or until the penne is cooked. Stir every few minutes.
  3. Once pasta is cooked, take off heat, or put on very low. Add in the spinach one handful at a time and stir until wilted. Add the drained cannellini beans and the almond ricotta, or regular ricotta. Stir together and serve.
  4. Dust with a small amount of nutmeg and enjoy!

Nutritional Information

367 calories | 10.8 g total fat | 2.5 g polyunsaturated | 5.9 g monounsaturated | 1.3 g saturated | 0 g trans fats | 0-3 mg (depending on ricotta) | 1157 mg sodium | 52 g carbohydrates | 11 g fiber | 7 g total sugar | 17 g protein | 583% Vitamin A | 18% Vitamin C | 142% Vitamin K | 50% Magnesium | 30% Copper | 26% Iron

Green Beans & Cranberries

Anytime I see fresh green beans at the store I have to grab a bag. There will be a few more green bean recipes to come, but this was my first recipe I did with fresh green beans. They add a juicy crunch that I love. Then there’s cranberries. Fresh cranberries are great for vitamin C, but the dried, not so much. It’s more added as a flavoring and not a major part of the dish. You can use fresh cranberries if they are available but it will be more tart. So, if you are looking for a sweeter lighter side and with some health benefits, try this one.

Green Beans
  • High in fiber
  • High in Vitamin K for bone health
  • High in antioxidants good for your immune system
  • High in antioxidants good for your eye health

Green Beans and Cranberries

  • Servings: 6 side servings
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Ingredients

  • 2 lbs. fresh green beans, trimmed and snapped
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup dried cranberries
  • 2 tsp black pepper
  • Season with lemon zest & slivered almonds if desired

Directions

  1. Add water to a medium pot 2/3 full, and bring to boil.
  2. Add in green beans and boil for 5 minutes. Once they are somewhat soft but still have some crisp to them, drain and rinse with cold water to stop the cooking.
  3. Add olive oil to large skillet and heat on medium-high heat. Add green beans, lemon juice, cranberries, and black pepper. Saute for about 5-10 minutes. With the lemon juice, the cranberries will get soft and start to let off more of their flavor as the lemon juice breaks it down.
  4. Once green beans are desired tenderness, turn off heat and serve.
  5. Season with lemon zest or slivered almonds if desired.

Nutritional Information

85 calories | 2.6 g total fat | 0.4 g saturated fat | 0.4 g polyunsaturated fat | 1.7 g monounsaturated fat | 0 g trans fat | 0 mg cholesterol | 9.6 mg sodium | 12.4 g carbohydrates | 4.5 g fiber | 5.4 g sugar | 2.9 g protein

Macros

58% Carbohydrates | 28% Fat | 14% Protein

Dietary Servings per Portion
  • 0.2 Fruit
  • 2.6 Vegetables

Creamy Green Chili Enchilada Stew

Nothing says fall better than a creamy stew. Some of our families favorite recipes are ones that use green chilies. This stew is basically a deconstructed version of my Hatch Green Chili Enchiladas that you can eat in a bowl with tortillas or not. Plus it’s easier to make with less time. So when I really want the enchiladas but I don’t want to put in the effort, or it’s no longer August and the chilies are not fresh but I still want a green chili something, this is what happens.

Green Chilis
  • Good Source of Vitamin A
  • Good Source of Vitamin C
  • Good Source of Vitamin K
  • Capsaicin
  • Helps to increase metabolism
Capsaicin

Capsaicin is found in all chili peppers including green chili peppers. It’s responsible for the spicy burning feeling. The hotter the pepper, the more capsaicin. Green chilies don’t have as much and are usually mild.

  • Found to decrease cluster headaches
  • Relieves pain (ironically) especially for joints
  • Improves blood sugar and insulin reactions

So although green chilies might be relatively low in capsaicin, it still has a lot benefits for us. If you can find raw green chilis, take 1 or 2 and after taking out the seeds, chop them and saute them with the onion. You’ll get a additional boost more than you will just from the canned chilies.

Creamy Green Chili Enchilada Stew

  • Servings: 6 Servings
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I usually 1/2 the first part of the recipe since my family uses both plant based and meat based versions. I do half hearts of palm and half chicken. The stew base stays the same. Adjust it how you need to for your family. I use hearts of palm so that it’s plant-based and soy-free, but if you want to add more plant-based protein use your favorite chicken alternative.

Ingredients

  • 1 Tbsp oil
  • 2 can hearts of palm, drained and pulled into strips OR 4 large chicken breasts, boiled and shredded
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 4 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 “chicken” bouillon cube, broken up or 1 tbsp poultry seasoning (if using hearts of palm)
  • 2 tsp cumin, divided
  • Small amount of water or broth
  • STEW BASE
  • 1/2-1 c water or vegetable broth
  • 2 (15 oz) cans or 3 cups cooked pinto beans
  • 2 (4 oz) cans hatch green chilies or 2 roasted hatch chilies, chopped
  • 1 Tbsp cumin
  • 1 tsp oregano
  • 1 1/2 cup Greek Style Yogurt, or Plain Unsweetened Plant-Based Yogurt (I use Kite Hill)
  • 1 15 oz. can hatch green chili enchilada sauce
  • Salt and Pepper, to taste
  • TO SERVE
  • Cilantro
  • Limes
  • Avocado
  • Whole Wheat Flour or Corn Tortillas

Directions

  1. If you are using chicken, make sure the chicken is boiled and shredded. If you are using the hearts of palm, make sure the hearts of palm is shredded as well. The easiest way is by using two forks like you would with shredded chicken.
  2. Add a small amount of oil to a medium skillet, heat on medium-high heat. Add onion and cook until translucent. Add in chicken or hearts of palm. Cook for a few minutes. Add in the garlic powder, crumbled bouillon cube or poultry seasoning, cumin, and just enough water to fill the bottom of the pan. Stir together. Simmer on medium-low heat until liquid is absorbed.
  3. Make the stew base. In a medium to large sauce pan, add vegetable broth, pinto beans, green chilis, cumin, oregano, Greek-style yogurt, enchilada sauce and stir together. Simmer until warmed through. Taste and add salt and pepper if desired. You can add the chicken or hearts of palm mixture to the base if desired. We keep it separate since we have 2 versions.
  4. To serve, add the stew base, top with chicken or hearts of palm if not already combined, chopped cilantro, lime juice, avocado, and toasted tortillas.

Nutritional Information:
With Chicken without Toppings

331 calories | 6.3 g total fat | 1.1 g saturated fat | 1.6 g polyunsaturated fat | 2.6 g monounsaturated fat | 0 g trans fats | 91 mg cholesterol | 1071 mg sodium (if not using low sodium canned goods) | 22.7 g carbohydrates | 4.8 g fiber | 3.6 g sugar | 46 g protein

Macro Sources

27% Carbohydrates | 17% Fat | 56% Protein

Dietary Servings per Portion
  • 1.7 Meat
  • 0.4 Meat Alternative
  • 0.3 Milk Alternative
  • 1.0 Vegetables
Nutritional Information
With Hearts of Palm without Toppings

235 calories | 8.2 g total fat | 4.0 g saturated fat | 1.3 g polyunsaturated fat | 2.3 monounsaturated fat | 0 g trans fat | 0 mg cholesterol | 1192 mg sodium (if not using low sodium canned goods) | 32 g carbohydrates | 10.2 g fiber | 2.3 g sugar | 8.0 g protein

Macro Sources

55% Carbohydrates | 31% Fat | 14% Protein

Dietary Servings per Portion
  • 0.4 Meat Alternative
  • 2.5 Vegetables

Dairy Free Whipped Cream

Did you know “non-dairy” products are not completely dairy-free? Confusing I know. “Non-dairy” whipped toppings or “non-dairy” creamers can still have milk proteins in it like whey and casein, as allowed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. To see my previous post about dairy labels, click here.

With that being said, I wanted to share with you what I do to make dairy-free whipped cream that is also soy-free as well. It’s not anything new. There are plenty of coconut whipped creams out there, but it’s one of my staples and something that is good to know if you or a family member is allergic to dairy. James is lactose-intolerant and there are a few things that he’s gotten use to, like almond milk in his smoothies and soy in his lattes. But when I had made this he couldn’t get over how good it was. I originally made a version of it to go on a cake I made with fresh berries and since then have adjusted some things to my liking.

Some things I want you to know are that:

  • No, it’s not as easy as just buying whipped cream from the store, there is some forethought.
  • It’s not that hard to do.
  • It’s dairy free, but this is still just straight up fat, and not all healthy fats.

I can’t say this is a “healthy” recipe, as it is an alternative to a major food allergy so you don’t have to miss out on whipped topping for your pumpkin pie this year.

A healthy alternative for a dessert using the whipped cream would be having fresh fruit with a dollop of this instead of a pie with added sugars and a buttery crust. Just know that you need to use this sparingly as with any whipped cream, but it’s definitely something to try and no hidden ingredients!

Dairy Free Whipped Cream

  • Servings: 2 cups of whipped cream, 16 2-Tablespoon servings
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Ingredients

  • 1 13.5 oz can of coconut milk, full fat not lite
  • 2/3 cup powdered sugar, optional, depending on if you want it sweet or how sweet you like it
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • Optional – You can use other extracts like almond, lemon, cinnamon, etc. depending on what you are making it for

Directions

  1. Before you start, freeze the bowl and whisk you’ll be using, and put the can of coconut milk in the fridge. DO NOT SHAKE. The colder it is the firmer it will be. At least have them in the fridge/freezer for about 2-4 hours.
  2. Take the bowl, whisk, and canned coconut milk out. Open the coconut milk. The cream should be at the top of the can. The coconut water will be below the cream. Carefully take out the cream and put it in the bowl without getting any coconut water in the bowl. Leave some cream in there if you have to.
  3. Whisk like crazy! Use a mixer if needed. Add in the powdered sugar if using a little at a time until it’s all incorporated. Add in the vanilla extract. You might need to put the bowl in the fridge or freezer after a few minutes to cool it back off. Sometimes I have to, other times I don’t. Just whisk until it forms stiff peaks.
  4. I usually will make this early and put it back in the fridge for a few hours until ready to use. Just remember to keep it cold.
  5. Top your favorite dessert or fruit with it and enjoy!

Nutritional Information

152 calories | 10.4 g total fat | 0 mg cholesterol | 1.2 mg sodium | 13.4 g carbohydrates | 0.4 g fiber | 10.7 g sugar | 1.1 g protein

Macro Sources

35% Carbohydrates | 61% Fat | 4% Protein

Dietary Servings per Portion

N/A

Almond Ricotta

Here’s is a dairy free ricotta recipe I use. Once I learned I could do this and how simple it was, I started using it to make things creamy in a lot of recipes. I added it to pasta sauces, veggie pizza, spread on toast, etc. Classic ricotta is already low fat and so is this recipe. So if you are looking to replace the classic version with a dairy-free version, you will be able to replace it almost equally. It is a little higher in carbohydrates because of it being from almonds, but it also has fiber when classic ricotta does not. There is a little more fat, but almost all the fat is unsaturated, which is the healthy omega 3 and omega 6. The classic ricotta is more saturated fat, which isn’t awful, but harder for your body to break down.

A pasta recipe coming next month will use this almond ricotta! YUM!

Almond Ricotta

  • Servings: 12 2-Tbsp servings, about 1 1/2 cups
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Ingredients

  • 1 cup raw, blanched, skinless almonds (slivered almonds is what I use)
  • up to 1/2 cup water, depending on thickness
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 2 tbsp nutritional yeast
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice
  • salt and pepper if desired

Directions

  1. Soak almonds in enough water to cover them for 20 minutes if you have a high powered blender. If not, soak them 4 hours or overnight. If using sliced almonds, you won’t have to soak them as long.
  2. Add the drained almonds, garlic, nutritional yeast, lemon juice, and salt and pepper to blender. Add a small amount of water to start and add more if needed. Blend until smooth.

Nutritional Information

2 Tablespoon Serving

62 calories | 4.5 g total fat | 0.3 g saturated fat | 0 g trans fat | 0 mg cholesterol | 3.2 mg sodium | 2.6 g carbohydrates | 1.4 g fiber | 0.6 g total sugar | 3 g protein

Macro Breakdown

17% Carbohydrates | 64% Fat | 19% Protein

Dietary Servings per Portion

0.2 Meat Alternative

Chloe Coscarelli’s Golden Gravy

I had to share with you one of my favorite gravy recipes from Chloe Coscarelli. She is a vegan chef and I have used her first recipe book, Chloe’s Kitchen, front to back. This is her Golden Gravy recipe and I wanted to share it with you for a few reasons. Yes, this is a plant-based recipe for gravy but that’s not why I’m sharing it. Compared to your average beef/turkey broth version with flour and butter, this version gives some nutritional value without sacrificing any flavor.

Benefits
  • Less sodium
  • Less fat
  • High in B Vitamins
  • High in Fiber
  • Gives us 30% of the daily Omega 3s

Something I’ve learned – taking pictures of gravy is not as easy as it looks!

Chloe Coscarelli's Golden Gravy

  • Servings: 1/2 cup, about 6 servings
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Ingredients

  • 2 tbsp canola oil
  • 1 large onion, roughly chopped
  • 1/4 cup nutritional yeast flakes
  • 1/2 cup flour
  • 2 cups water
  • 3 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 tsp dried thyme
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • Salt and Pepper

Directions

  1. In a medium saucepan, heat oil over medium-high heat and sauté onion until soft. Add nutritional yeast and flour, and stir for about 1 minute. Add water, soy sauce, thyme and garlic powder. Continue to cook, whisking continuously, until mixture is very thick. Transfer gravy to a blender and purée until smooth. Adjust seasonings, and add salt and pepper to taste.

Nutritional Information

117 calories | 5 g fat | 1.3 g polyunsaturated fat | 3 g monounsaturated fat | <0.5 g saturated fat | 0 trans fats | 0 mg cholesterol | 614 mg sodium | 13.5 g carbohydrates | 1.6 g fiber | 1.3 g sugar | 5 g protein | >100% folate, thiamin (B1), riboflavin (B2), and niacin (B3)

Soy Free Version

Because of my allergy to soy, instead of soy sauce I’ve substituted Worcestershire sauce instead. Chef Chloe also has a Soy-Free Soy Sauce that I’ve made before to use in this recipe.

Chloe Coscarelli's Soy-Free Soy Sauce

Ingredients

  • 1 cup vegetable broth
  • 1 tbsp balsamic vinegar
  • 2 tsp molasses
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • Pinch garlic powder
  • Pinch ground ginger

Directions

  1. Combine all of the ingredients in a small saucepan.
  2. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring frequently.
  3. Reduce heat to medium and allow to lightly boil for 5 minutes. Allow to cool then store in an air tight container in the fridge for up to 1 week.

Chipotle Black Bean Chili

The chipotle chili in adobo sauce is something you don’t want to miss out on. It adds a smokey flavor and the smell while it’s cooking is one of those things you want to permeate the house. It’s something I keep in mind for busy days or weeks. Freezer and slow-cooker options are below as well as some of the health benefits.

 

Black Beans
  • High in Fiber
  • Good Source of Magnesium
  • Good Source of Iron
  • High in Flavonoids – which has antioxidant abilities
  • Helps Lower Cholesterol
  • Aids Digestion
  • Controls Blood Sugar
My Favorite Bean:

Like other beans, black beans have a sugar that our body has a hard time breaking down. Hence the bloating and musical notes which are the unpleasant side effects beans are known for. However, black beans have less of this sugar than other beans. It shouldn’t put you in as much discomfort (or embarrassment) as other beans will. It’s a win win for everyone at the table.

Quinoa
  • High in Fiber
  • Low in Fat
  • High in Minerals
  • Complete Plant Based Protein

Although you do not need to consume complete proteins to get the amount of protein you need throughout the day, it is good to know the sources of them. Being plant-based and soy-free, quinoa is something I regularly have in my kitchen.

Lean Ground Meat Option

You can add a lean meat like ground turkey or a lean ground beef if you feel that you need it. By using lean meats it has less unhealthy fats, less cholesterol and overall better for your heart health when compared to average ground meats. Whatever option you decide, just make sure it’s lean. The only advantage that ground turkey has is that it does have a fat-free version you can find and beef does not.

However, my family members eat this without meat and is completely full and satisfied. This would be a great “Meatless Monday” meal if you are just starting to dive into vegetarian meals and plant proteins. It won’t disappoint.

Meal Prep & Slow Cooker Options
  • Meal Prep | Freeze all uncooked ingredients before putting it in the slow cooker for 6-8 hours.
  • Slow Cooker | Set on low for 6-8 hours. Add an extra cup of water or broth.
  • For families of 2-4 people, this will make more than one dinner. You can freeze 1/2 of it or when prepping, make 2 separate meals. 1 to have one week and another for the next week.

Chipotle Black Bean Chili

  • Servings: 10 Servings, 1 1/2 cup per serving
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Ingredients

  • 1 cup uncooked black quinoa, rinsed OR 2 lbs. ground turkey, uncooked
  • 2 cups vegetable broth, if using quinoa
  • 1 tbsp oil
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1 tbsp chili powder
  • 1 tbsp ground cumin
  • 1 (28 oz) can crushed tomatoes with juice
  • 2 (19 oz) cans black beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1/2 green bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 red bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 zucchini, chopped
  • 1 large chipotle chili in adobo sauce, minced
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • 1 cup frozen corn
  • salt and pepper, if desired
  • cilantro & limes for serving

Directions

  1. Bring vegetable broth to boil and add quinoa. Reduce to simmer, cover and cook for about 15-20 minutes. Once cooked, turn off heat and set aside. If using turkey, cook the turkey and crumble it. Once it’s cooked, turn off heat and set aside.
  2. Heat the oil in a large pot over medium-high heat. Add onion and cook until translucent. Add in the garlic, chili powder, and cumin. Cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the tomatoes with juice, drained black beans, green and red bell pepper, zucchini, chipotle chili, and oregano. Season with salt and pepper. Bring to simmer and cover for 20 minutes.
  3. Stir in the quinoa and corn and cook for about 5 minutes more.
  4. You can let it simmer on low for a few hours. Adding water or broth if needed. Or you can serve with cilantro and limes.

Crock Pot Directions Add all ingredients to the crock pot, stir and set on low for 6-8 hours. If you can, you might want to stir the chili about 1/2 way and add vegetable broth if needed. I usually will add an extra cup of broth or water to the recipe when it’s going to be in the crock pot, especially for 8 hours.

Nutritional Information

Chipotle Black Bean Chili with Quinoa: 

205 calories | 3.4 g total fat | 1 g saturated fat | 2.0 g polyunsaturated fat | 3.6 g monounsaturated fat | 0 mg cholesterol | 363 mg sodium | 35 g carbohydrates | 8.4 g fiber | 3.2 g sugar | 8.6 g protein

Macro Sources

68% Carbohydrates | 15% Fat | 17% Protein

Dietary Servings per Portion
  • 0.8 Grain
  • 0.3 Meat Alternative
  • 2.5 Vegetables

 

Super Greens with Clementines & Roasted Pecans

One of my favorite salad recipes! Usually dinner is the heaviest meal for me, so I like putting salads with dinner to keep it lighter. This recipe is what I usually put with spicy foods. Anytime I make something with Cajun seasoning, this is what I like to have on the side to cool it off. Not to mention it’s delicious and healthy.

Clementines
  • High in Vitamin C which boosts the immune system and promotes healthy skin
  • Aids in Digestion
  • High in Minerals
  • High in Antioxidants
Roasted Pecans
  • Healthy Fats
  • Helps Lower Bad Cholesterol
  • High Fiber
  • Energy Maintenance
  • Improves Brain Function

 

Super Greens with Clementines & Roasted Pecans

  • Servings: 4-6 servings, about 1 cup per serving
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Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup orange juice
  • 2 tbsp lemon juice
  • 2 tsp orange zest, or clementine zest
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 tsp dijon mustard
  • salt & pepper
  • 4 clementines, peeled and in slices
  • 8-10 oz. Super Greens (I used swiss chard, spinach, and arugula)
  • 1 cup toasted chopped pecans

Directions

  1. Make the dressing. Whisk together the orange juice, lemon juice, orange zest, olive oil, and dijon mustard. Taste and add salt and pepper if desired.
  2. If your pecans are not already toasted, heat a small skillet on low without anything but the pecans and let it slowly toast while you constantly move them around so that they don’t burn. Once you start to small the pecans, turn off the heat and throw the toasted pecans in a small bowl to cool off.
  3. Take your greens, clementines, and cooled toasted pecans, and toss with the dressing. Serve immediately!

Nutritional Information

234 calories | 20 g fat | 5 g polyunsaturated <1 g omega 3, 4.5 g omega 6 | 12 g monounsaturated | 2 g saturated | 0 g trans | 0 mg cholesterol | 63 mg sodium | 14 g carbohydrates | 4 g fiber | 8 g total sugar | 4 g protein | 68% vitamin C | 206% vitamin A | 278% vitamin K | 11% iron | 24% magnesium

Amelie’s Wheat Germ Pancakes

Pancakes are not a regular thing, more because of how our mornings go. Grab something and go. But when we do have a morning and we can cook a breakfast, this is one of the family recipes we make. This recipe that has been in my family for years from a family friend, Amelie. They are delicious, filling, and has a bit of a sweet nutty flavor because of the wheat germ in them. Yum! We’ve made them as smaller pancakes since they are heavier, so don’t be fooled by their size.

Wheat Germ

Wheat germ is the reproductive part of wheat that can produce a whole new plant. Because of that, wheat germ is a concentrated source of essential nutrients.

It’s a high source of:

  • Vitamin E – healthy healthy skin cells
  • Folate – needed to make DNA
  • Phosphorus – works with calcium for healthy bones
  • Thiamin – healthy nervous system, muscles, and intestines
  • Zinc – healthy immune system
  • Magnesium – healthy nervous system and muscles
  • Essential Fatty Acids and Fatty Alcohols – anti-inflammatory, healthy brain function
  • Fiber – weight management, healthy digestive system

It truly is the opposite of white processed bread. It consists of all the good things white bread is stripped of when being processed. Just make sure you store it correctly in the fridge or freezer out of sunlight to ensure freshness once the container or bag has been opened.

Amelie's Wheat Germ Pancakes

  • Servings: 3 servings (2 pancakes per serving) Makes 6 3-inch pancakes
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Ingredients

  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tbsp sugar
  • 1 1/2 tbsp applesauce
  • 1/2 cup old fashion oats
  • 1 tbsp wheat germ (You can always bump up the nutritional content by adding another tablespoon)
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 cup almond milk
  • 1 egg
  • 1 cup whole wheat flour
  • 1 green apple
  • Cinnamon
  • Maple Syrup

EGG-FREE: If you want to make this recipe egg-free, use 1 tbsp chia or flax seeds with 1/4 cup water. Let it sit by itself for about 10-15 minutes so that it becomes gelatinous. Add it into the recipe like you would the egg.

Directions

  1. Combine all ingredients except for the flour and apple. Poke the egg so that it can mix together.
  2. Add in the flour. Don’t over mix.
  3. Thinly slice the green apple. You can leave the skin on, but it will be harder to cut and eat after the pancakes are made.
  4. Heat a large skillet on medium high heat. If not using a non-stick skillet, add a small amount of oil to the bottom. Once the skillet is warm, turn down the heat to medium-low.
  5. Using a 1/3 cup measuring cup and pour batter into skillet. Top with the sliced apples. Once the batter is bubbling in the center you can flip the pancakes and cook for about another minute.
  6. Remove from skillet and continue with the rest of the batter. In a large skillet you should be able to make 3-4 pancakes at a time.
  7. When serving dust with cinnamon and drizzle with maple syrup.

Nutritional Information

Using an Egg, 1 Serving without Maple Syrup

301 calories | 5.5 g total fat | 1 g saturated fat | 64 mg cholesterol | 383 mg sodium | 51 g carbohydrates | 6.8 g fiber | 10.2 g sugar | 10.8 g protein

Using Chia “Egg”, 1 Serving without Maple Syrup

295 calories | 4.8 g total fat | 0.5 g saturated fat | 0 g cholesterol | 362 mg sodium | 53 g carbohydrates | 8.2 g fiber | 10.1 g sugar | 9.3 g protein

Macro Sources

70% Carbohydrates | 16% Fat | 14% Protein

Dietary Servings per Portion
  • 0.3 Fruit
  • 2.5 Grain
  • 0.2 Meat Alternative
  • 0.3 Milk Alternative