Garbanzo Flour Eggs

Since February is “Heart Health Month”, I thought I’d share with you an egg alternative that is truly heart healthy, and not just because it’s cholesterol-free. There has been studies that show it’s more the saturated fat than the dietary cholesterol that raises bad cholesterol. And although that might be true, eggs are one of the most dietary-cholesterol dense foods out there. So although there might be worse things for you to eat, especially when watching your cholesterol, limiting your intake of dietary cholesterol will help too.

Eggs are one of the things I craved when making the switch to being plant based. I have them here and there but it makes my stomach feel heavy and sometimes I’ll feel like I’m going to get sick about an hour after eating them. So I’ve looked for other options and here is an easy recipe to make at home for those staying away from eggs. Whether that’s because of an allergy, you’re watching your cholesterol, or are plant-based.

This recipe uses garbanzo flour. Since garbanzo beans have a sulfuric taste and smell, they do great for making an egg substitute. There is also a black salt called “kala namak”, usually found in Indian grocery stores, that has a sulfuric taste and smell too that you can use instead of regular salt. Note that it isn’t just “black salt” that you can find some places, but you will have to find something titled “kala namak”.

So let’s still talk about garbazo bean flour for a second and learn why this isn’t just an alternative egg recipe, but also a nutritious one.

Garbanzo Flour
  • High in Fiber to help with Weight Management, Heart Health, Stabilize Blood Sugar
  • Beans like Garbanzo Beans (Chickpeas), help to Lower Cholesterol Naturally
  • Lowers Inflammation
  • Improves Immune Fuction
  • Easily Digestible & Gluten-Free
Basic Recipe & What I Use

Before I show you the base recipe I use at home, I wanted to give you the equation I use for making garbanzo eggs.

1/4 garbanzo flour to 1/4 liquid = 1 large egg

The Liquid I Use

I use to use water but found that it came out dry. I used almond milk and it helped a little, but then I started using the liquid from a can of chickpeas known as “aquafaba” or bean water. It has proteins in it from the beans. Because of that, when whipped it can even be used in place of egg whites in some recipes. Since I use a can of chickpeas at least once a week, I just put the chickpeas in a container and store it in the fridge and use the liquid from the can. Easy as that!

It still comes out a little dry compared to normal eggs, but when you use it with other veggies and add a sauce it’s great! It does better as being an omelet since scrambling it can be a little bit of a hassle, but can still work!

Cholesterol-Free Garbanzo Flour Eggs

  • Servings: Makes 2-3 eggs worth, 1-2 servings
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Ingredients

  • 1/2 c garbanzo flour
  • 1/2 cup aquafaba (liquid from 1 can chickpeas)
  • 1/2 tsp garlic
  • 1/2 tsp onion
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • turmeric, for color
  • Salt and Pepper, to taste (or kala namak salt)

Directions

  1. Whisk together ingredients in a small bowl. Once it is combined, pour into skillet. If you are using a non-stick skillet you will not need to add any oil. If you do not have a non-stick skillet, use a small amount of oil before pouring. Heat the skillet on medium heat.
  2. Once the batter starts to bubble in the middle like a pancake would you can either flip it if you are going to use it as an omelet or start to scramble it with the spatula. You might have to cut it after it’s done to scramble it more once it’s out of the pan.
  3. It usually takes about 5-10 minutes for it to cook.

If you are wanting to make a scramble with veggies, the scrambling becomes easier since it won’t stick to itself as easily. I’m sure I’ll be adding some omelet or veggie scramble recipes soon using garbanzo flour.

Nutritional Information for Whole Recipe

107 calories | 1.8 g total fat | 0.2 g saturated fat | 0.7 g polyunsaturated fat | 0.4 g monounsaturated fat | 0 g trans fat | 0 mg cholesterol | 181 mg sodium | 16.9 g carbohydrates | 2.9 g fiber | 2.6 g sugar | 6.0 g protein

Macro Sources

63% Carbohydrates | 15% Fat | 22% Protein

Dietary Servings per Portion
  • 1.1 Meat Alternative
  • 0.5 Vegetables
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Green Beans & Tomatoes with Fresh Oregano

Stewed tomatoes and green beans just go together. This is one of the side dishes I keep in mind any time of year and can go with just about anything. Simple ingredients, simple instructions, and so good! Nutritionally let’s look at the benefits of using fresh oregano. Sometimes we forget how powerful our fresh herbs are and what they bring to the table other than flavor. Fresh herbs are powerhouses of nutrients and antioxidants which is nice since we usually use a small amount of them when we cook. Here are some interesting facts about oregano, as well as many other herbs in general.

Fresh Oregano
  • Powerhouse of Antioxidants – 42 times the antioxidants found in apples
  • Improves Immune System
  • Anti-Inflammatory
  • Significant of Crucial Minerals for Bone Health

Dried herbs have their purpose in cooking, but to get the full benefit it’s always good to use fresh herbs when you can.

Green Beans & Tomatoes with Fresh Oregano

  • Servings: 4 Servings
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Ingredients

  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 lb. fresh green beans, ends snapped
  • 1 14 oz. can of diced tomatoes, undrained
  • 1/2 cup vegetable broth
  • 1 tbsp fresh oregano
  • 1 tbsp fresh parsley
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice

Directions

  1. Heat oil in a medium pan on medium-high heat. If you are using a non-stick pot, you can put the heat on medium and cook the onions without oil. Add onions and cook until translucent. Add garlic until fragrant, about 30 seconds.
  2. Toss in the green beans, tomatoes, broth, oregano, and parsley. Let it simmer for about 10-15 minutes until the green beans are at the desired tenderness. I usually wait until the green beans are a dark rich green color, like the picture, and turn off the heat.
  3. Season with salt and pepper if desired. Add lemon juice and serve immediately.

Nutritional Information

158 calories | 7.4 g total fat | 1.4 g saturated fat | 1.6 g polyunsaturated fat | 6.4 g monounsaturated fat | 0 g trans fat | 0 mg cholesterol | 192 mg sodium | 18.5 g carbohydrates | 5.6 g fiber | 4.6 g sugar | 4.2 g protein

Macros

47% Carbohydrates | 42% Fat | 11% Protein

Dietary Servings per Portion

3.0 Vegetables

Chloe Coscarelli’s Barley Bliss Casserole

I know I have posted a few of Chef Chloe’s recipes, but these are truly some of the recipes I make at home all the time. This is a nutritious comfort dish. Yes those can exist! It’s full of vegetables, fiber, and whole grains and once it’s done, it comes out creamy and delicious! Let’s talk about barley for a moment and why it’s good for you.

Note that if you are trying to be gluten-free barley is one of the grains that does contain gluten.

Barley
For One Cup Cooked Barley:
  • 10 grams of Fiber
  • 7 grams of Protein
  • 20% Magnesium
  • 18% Niacin (B3)
  • 9% Zinc
What Barley Helps With:
  • Digestion
  • Weight Loss
  • Control Blood Sugar
  • Provides Antioxidants
  • Good for Heart Health

Then the added benefits of the vegetables, red kidney beans, and nutritional yeast that is in this recipe, it’s no doubt why it’s one of my favorites! I eat this with a salad for dinner and make either chicken or pork chops for the rest of my family as a meal. This does take some time in the oven so it’s better to make in fall or winter. Like I said before, this has become one of my healthy comfort foods. It’s creamy, flavorful, and the barley is gives it a great texture!

Barley Bliss Casserole by Chloe Coscarelli

  • Servings: 12 1-cup side servings, 6 2-cup main dish servings
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Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 large onion, finely chopped
  • 1 green pepper, seeded and diced
  • 8 ounces baby bella or crimini mushrooms, trimmed and sliced
  • 2 teaspoons garlic powder
  • 2 teaspoons dried thyme
  • 2 teaspoons sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 14-ounce can diced tomatoes, undrained
  • 1 15-ounce can red kidney beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1.5 cups pearled barley
  • 1/2 cup nutritional yeast flakes
  • 2.5 cups soy, almond, or rice milk
  • 2 cups water

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. In a large skillet, heat olive oil over medium heat and saute onions, green peppers, and mushrooms until soft and lightly browned.
  3. Add garlic powder, thyme, salt, and pepper and let cook a few more minutes.
  4. Transfer vegetables to a 9″ x 13″ pan. Gently stir in tomatoes, beans, barley, nutritional yeast, non-dairy milk, and water. The pan will be very full.
  5. Cover pan with foil and carefully place in the oven. Let cook for 1 hour and 15 minutes, and then remove the foil.
  6. Let bake, uncovered, stirring occasionally with a wooden spoon, for 20 to 30 minutes more, or until barley is cooked and most of the liquid is absorbed. Remove from oven and let rest for 5 minutes before serving.

Nutritional Information

For 1 cup serving:

211 calories | 3.75 g total fat | 0.6 g polyunsaturated fat | 0.4 g monounsaturated fat | 0.8 g saturated fat | 0 g trans fats | 0 mg cholesterol | 904 mg sodium | 36 g carbohydrates | 6.7 g fiber | 6 g sugar| 10 g protein | 185% folate (folic acid) | 283% Thiamin (B1) | 211% Riboflavin (B2) | 129% Niacin (B3) | 12% Calcium | 20% Magnesium | 15% Iron | 23% Zinc

White Bean & Kale Italian Soup

One of my favorite ways to eat kale is in soups. It’s a hearty enough green that it keeps it’s form when cooked and in broth and it add a deep rich green color to your meal. This simple bean and vegetable stew it’s great when you just want to warm up, or are getting sick, or just want a low-fat high-fiber meal. I like to make this recipe this time of year because of it being flu season and the extra nutrition boost it can give. Check out some the benefits of white beans & kale.

Benefits of White Beans
  • High Fiber
  • High in Plant-Based Protein
  • Helps Healthy Weight Loss
  • Regulates Blood Sugar
  • High in Magnesium for Heart Health, Bone Health, Nerve Health, etc.
Benefits of Kale
  • Cruciferous Vegetable – Known to Fight Cancer
  • Anti-Inflammatory
  • Rich in Vitamin C
  • Helps to Lower Bad Cholesterol
  • High in Lutein for Healthy Vision

No doubt this antioxidant rich, high fiber, delicious stew is one to keep in your recipe box for emergencies during flu season!

 

White Bean and Kale Italian Soup

  • Servings: 4 servings as meal
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Ingredients

  • 1 small yellow onion, chopped
  • 2 large garlic cloves, minced
  • 3 medium carrots, chopped
  • 2 celery sticks, chopped
  • 1 small bunch of kale, chopped
  • 1 cup dry white wine*
  • 4-6 cups vegetable broth, depending on how much broth you’d like
  • 1 15oz. can cannelloni beans, drained or 3 cups cooked cannelloni beans
  • 1 tsp ground sage
  • 1 tsp dried thyme
  • 1 tbsp dried parsley
  • salt and pepper to taste

*I use a cup of white wine to give it an added layer of flavor. When wine is cooked the alcohol and any sulfites, that many can be allergic to, are cooked off. If you don’t want to put wine in the soup, add another cup of vegetable broth or until it is as thick or thin as you’d like it to be.

Directions

  1. Heat a large pot on low heat, add onion, if you’d like to add a small amount of oil you can or keep the heat on low to allow the onion to excrete all it’s juices. Once the onion is cooking and starting to be translucent, add in the garlic. Cook until fragrant – about 1 minute. Add in carrots and celery and allow to cook for a few minutes until carrots start to get soft. About 7-10 minutes.
  2. Add in the chopped kale, dry white wine (optional), and vegetable broth. Allow to simmer and the kale to wilt. 5 minutes.
  3. Add in the cooked beans, sage, thyme, and parsley. Let simmer for a few minutes. Taste and add salt and pepper if needed.

Nutritional Information

284 calories | 3.6 g total fat | 1.9 g polyunsaturated fat | 0.6 g monounsaturated fat | 0.5 g saturated | 0 g trans fats | 0 mg cholesterol | 1235 mg sodium (depending on broth) | 43 g carbohydrates | 15 g fiber | 6.6 g total sugar | 11.7 g protein | 502% Vitamin A | 88% Vitamin C | 433% Vitamin K | 18% Calcium | 20% Iron

Know Your Ingredients: The Many Names Soy

The next on my “Know Your Ingredients” posts is soy. It’s one of my worst and it’s partly because of how wide spread it’s used, like corn. It’s easy to get an overload of soy without even trying, especially when you have processed foods. It is required in the US and is a federal “Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act” that labels clearly list soy in the ingredients or it could be listed after the ingredients as “Contains: Soy”. Advisory statements like, “may contain soy” or “made in a facility with soy” are optional. Better to know what you’re reading just in case some of these words pop up on the list of ingredients. Let’s break down where soy can be found and what it’s used in.

Soy (or Soya) Products
  • Bean curd
  • Edamame (soy beans in pods)
  • Miso (fermented soy)
    • I use a chickpea miso that I’ve found.
  • Soy sauce
  • Soy based flours, nuts, or sprouts
  • Soy protein
  • Soy Lecithin
  • Tamari
  • Tempeh
  • Tofu
Foods That Most Likely Contain Soy, and Will Need to Check the Label
  • Plant based dairy products: plant based milk, yogurt, butter, cheese, etc.
  • Textured Vegetable Protein (TVP)
  • Canned Broths and Soups
  • Canned Tuna and other Meats
  • Processed Meats / Frozen Burgers
  • Cereals
  • High Protein Energy Bars and Snacks
  • Plant-Based Protein Powders
  • Infant Formula
  • Vegetable Oils
  • Worcestershire Sauce
  • Soy Lecitin: often used in chocolate bars/candy, peanut butter, and margarine.
Other Names that May Use Soy Ingredients
  • Glycine max
  • Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein (HVP)
  • Mono-diglyceride
  • Monosodium Glytamate (MSG)
  • Artificial Flavoring
  • Natural Flavoring
  • Vegetable Broth
  • Vegetable Gum
  • Vegetable Starch

Something to always remember as well, although you might find a brand of, let’s say bread, that doesn’t have soy in the ingredients, it doesn’t mean that it won’t change. They don’t have to tell you when they change their ingredients. It can be a safe bet for a little while, but I always check from time to time to make sure the ingredients are the same as before.

Know your labels. Although it’s good that most packaged food will list if there is soy and clearly state, “Contains: Soy”, it doesn’t mean it won’t sneak in with the vegetable broth or plain “starch”. As with any allergy, especially if it’s severe, be aware and educate yourself. Knowing is half the battle. If you are just learning about this or another allergy, know that it’s okay to feel overwhelmed at first, because it is. But know that the more you learn and the more you adapt to the changes, the easier it becomes and reading labels won’t feel overwhelming and you’ll find your new products and recipes to make in no time!

Green Beans & Cranberries

Anytime I see fresh green beans at the store I have to grab a bag. There will be a few more green bean recipes to come, but this was my first recipe I did with fresh green beans. They add a juicy crunch that I love. Then there’s cranberries. Fresh cranberries are great for vitamin C, but the dried, not so much. It’s more added as a flavoring and not a major part of the dish. You can use fresh cranberries if they are available but it will be more tart. So, if you are looking for a sweeter lighter side and with some health benefits, try this one.

Green Beans
  • High in fiber
  • High in Vitamin K for bone health
  • High in antioxidants good for your immune system
  • High in antioxidants good for your eye health

Green Beans and Cranberries

  • Servings: 6 side servings
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Ingredients

  • 2 lbs. fresh green beans, trimmed and snapped
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup dried cranberries
  • 2 tsp black pepper
  • Season with lemon zest & slivered almonds if desired

Directions

  1. Add water to a medium pot 2/3 full, and bring to boil.
  2. Add in green beans and boil for 5 minutes. Once they are somewhat soft but still have some crisp to them, drain and rinse with cold water to stop the cooking.
  3. Add olive oil to large skillet and heat on medium-high heat. Add green beans, lemon juice, cranberries, and black pepper. Saute for about 5-10 minutes. With the lemon juice, the cranberries will get soft and start to let off more of their flavor as the lemon juice breaks it down.
  4. Once green beans are desired tenderness, turn off heat and serve.
  5. Season with lemon zest or slivered almonds if desired.

Nutritional Information

85 calories | 2.6 g total fat | 0.4 g saturated fat | 0.4 g polyunsaturated fat | 1.7 g monounsaturated fat | 0 g trans fat | 0 mg cholesterol | 9.6 mg sodium | 12.4 g carbohydrates | 4.5 g fiber | 5.4 g sugar | 2.9 g protein

Macros

58% Carbohydrates | 28% Fat | 14% Protein

Dietary Servings per Portion
  • 0.2 Fruit
  • 2.6 Vegetables

Dairy Free Whipped Cream

Did you know “non-dairy” products are not completely dairy-free? Confusing I know. “Non-dairy” whipped toppings or “non-dairy” creamers can still have milk proteins in it like whey and casein, as allowed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. To see my previous post about dairy labels, click here.

With that being said, I wanted to share with you what I do to make dairy-free whipped cream that is also soy-free as well. It’s not anything new. There are plenty of coconut whipped creams out there, but it’s one of my staples and something that is good to know if you or a family member is allergic to dairy. James is lactose-intolerant and there are a few things that he’s gotten use to, like almond milk in his smoothies and soy in his lattes. But when I had made this he couldn’t get over how good it was. I originally made a version of it to go on a cake I made with fresh berries and since then have adjusted some things to my liking.

Some things I want you to know are that:

  • No, it’s not as easy as just buying whipped cream from the store, there is some forethought.
  • It’s not that hard to do.
  • It’s dairy free, but this is still just straight up fat, and not all healthy fats.

I can’t say this is a “healthy” recipe, as it is an alternative to a major food allergy so you don’t have to miss out on whipped topping for your pumpkin pie this year.

A healthy alternative for a dessert using the whipped cream would be having fresh fruit with a dollop of this instead of a pie with added sugars and a buttery crust. Just know that you need to use this sparingly as with any whipped cream, but it’s definitely something to try and no hidden ingredients!

Dairy Free Whipped Cream

  • Servings: 2 cups of whipped cream, 16 2-Tablespoon servings
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Ingredients

  • 1 13.5 oz can of coconut milk, full fat not lite
  • 2/3 cup powdered sugar, optional, depending on if you want it sweet or how sweet you like it
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • Optional – You can use other extracts like almond, lemon, cinnamon, etc. depending on what you are making it for

Directions

  1. Before you start, freeze the bowl and whisk you’ll be using, and put the can of coconut milk in the fridge. DO NOT SHAKE. The colder it is the firmer it will be. At least have them in the fridge/freezer for about 2-4 hours.
  2. Take the bowl, whisk, and canned coconut milk out. Open the coconut milk. The cream should be at the top of the can. The coconut water will be below the cream. Carefully take out the cream and put it in the bowl without getting any coconut water in the bowl. Leave some cream in there if you have to.
  3. Whisk like crazy! Use a mixer if needed. Add in the powdered sugar if using a little at a time until it’s all incorporated. Add in the vanilla extract. You might need to put the bowl in the fridge or freezer after a few minutes to cool it back off. Sometimes I have to, other times I don’t. Just whisk until it forms stiff peaks.
  4. I usually will make this early and put it back in the fridge for a few hours until ready to use. Just remember to keep it cold.
  5. Top your favorite dessert or fruit with it and enjoy!

Nutritional Information

152 calories | 10.4 g total fat | 0 mg cholesterol | 1.2 mg sodium | 13.4 g carbohydrates | 0.4 g fiber | 10.7 g sugar | 1.1 g protein

Macro Sources

35% Carbohydrates | 61% Fat | 4% Protein

Dietary Servings per Portion

N/A

Chloe Coscarelli’s Golden Gravy

I had to share with you one of my favorite gravy recipes from Chloe Coscarelli. She is a vegan chef and I have used her first recipe book, Chloe’s Kitchen, front to back. This is her Golden Gravy recipe and I wanted to share it with you for a few reasons. Yes, this is a plant-based recipe for gravy but that’s not why I’m sharing it. Compared to your average beef/turkey broth version with flour and butter, this version gives some nutritional value without sacrificing any flavor.

Benefits
  • Less sodium
  • Less fat
  • High in B Vitamins
  • High in Fiber
  • Gives us 30% of the daily Omega 3s

Something I’ve learned – taking pictures of gravy is not as easy as it looks!

Chloe Coscarelli's Golden Gravy

  • Servings: 1/2 cup, about 6 servings
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Ingredients

  • 2 tbsp canola oil
  • 1 large onion, roughly chopped
  • 1/4 cup nutritional yeast flakes
  • 1/2 cup flour
  • 2 cups water
  • 3 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 tsp dried thyme
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • Salt and Pepper

Directions

  1. In a medium saucepan, heat oil over medium-high heat and sauté onion until soft. Add nutritional yeast and flour, and stir for about 1 minute. Add water, soy sauce, thyme and garlic powder. Continue to cook, whisking continuously, until mixture is very thick. Transfer gravy to a blender and purée until smooth. Adjust seasonings, and add salt and pepper to taste.

Nutritional Information

117 calories | 5 g fat | 1.3 g polyunsaturated fat | 3 g monounsaturated fat | <0.5 g saturated fat | 0 trans fats | 0 mg cholesterol | 614 mg sodium | 13.5 g carbohydrates | 1.6 g fiber | 1.3 g sugar | 5 g protein | >100% folate, thiamin (B1), riboflavin (B2), and niacin (B3)

Soy Free Version

Because of my allergy to soy, instead of soy sauce I’ve substituted Worcestershire sauce instead. Chef Chloe also has a Soy-Free Soy Sauce that I’ve made before to use in this recipe.

Chloe Coscarelli's Soy-Free Soy Sauce

Ingredients

  • 1 cup vegetable broth
  • 1 tbsp balsamic vinegar
  • 2 tsp molasses
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • Pinch garlic powder
  • Pinch ground ginger

Directions

  1. Combine all of the ingredients in a small saucepan.
  2. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring frequently.
  3. Reduce heat to medium and allow to lightly boil for 5 minutes. Allow to cool then store in an air tight container in the fridge for up to 1 week.

Super Greens with Clementines & Roasted Pecans

One of my favorite salad recipes! Usually dinner is the heaviest meal for me, so I like putting salads with dinner to keep it lighter. This recipe is what I usually put with spicy foods. Anytime I make something with Cajun seasoning, this is what I like to have on the side to cool it off. Not to mention it’s delicious and healthy.

Clementines
  • High in Vitamin C which boosts the immune system and promotes healthy skin
  • Aids in Digestion
  • High in Minerals
  • High in Antioxidants
Roasted Pecans
  • Healthy Fats
  • Helps Lower Bad Cholesterol
  • High Fiber
  • Energy Maintenance
  • Improves Brain Function

 

Super Greens with Clementines & Roasted Pecans

  • Servings: 4-6 servings, about 1 cup per serving
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Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup orange juice
  • 2 tbsp lemon juice
  • 2 tsp orange zest, or clementine zest
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 tsp dijon mustard
  • salt & pepper
  • 4 clementines, peeled and in slices
  • 8-10 oz. Super Greens (I used swiss chard, spinach, and arugula)
  • 1 cup toasted chopped pecans

Directions

  1. Make the dressing. Whisk together the orange juice, lemon juice, orange zest, olive oil, and dijon mustard. Taste and add salt and pepper if desired.
  2. If your pecans are not already toasted, heat a small skillet on low without anything but the pecans and let it slowly toast while you constantly move them around so that they don’t burn. Once you start to small the pecans, turn off the heat and throw the toasted pecans in a small bowl to cool off.
  3. Take your greens, clementines, and cooled toasted pecans, and toss with the dressing. Serve immediately!

Nutritional Information

234 calories | 20 g fat | 5 g polyunsaturated <1 g omega 3, 4.5 g omega 6 | 12 g monounsaturated | 2 g saturated | 0 g trans | 0 mg cholesterol | 63 mg sodium | 14 g carbohydrates | 4 g fiber | 8 g total sugar | 4 g protein | 68% vitamin C | 206% vitamin A | 278% vitamin K | 11% iron | 24% magnesium

Amelie’s Wheat Germ Pancakes

Pancakes are not a regular thing, more because of how our mornings go. Grab something and go. But when we do have a morning and we can cook a breakfast, this is one of the family recipes we make. This recipe that has been in my family for years from a family friend, Amelie. They are delicious, filling, and has a bit of a sweet nutty flavor because of the wheat germ in them. Yum! We’ve made them as smaller pancakes since they are heavier, so don’t be fooled by their size.

Wheat Germ

Wheat germ is the reproductive part of wheat that can produce a whole new plant. Because of that, wheat germ is a concentrated source of essential nutrients.

It’s a high source of:

  • Vitamin E – healthy healthy skin cells
  • Folate – needed to make DNA
  • Phosphorus – works with calcium for healthy bones
  • Thiamin – healthy nervous system, muscles, and intestines
  • Zinc – healthy immune system
  • Magnesium – healthy nervous system and muscles
  • Essential Fatty Acids and Fatty Alcohols – anti-inflammatory, healthy brain function
  • Fiber – weight management, healthy digestive system

It truly is the opposite of white processed bread. It consists of all the good things white bread is stripped of when being processed. Just make sure you store it correctly in the fridge or freezer out of sunlight to ensure freshness once the container or bag has been opened.

Amelie's Wheat Germ Pancakes

  • Servings: 3 servings (2 pancakes per serving) Makes 6 3-inch pancakes
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Ingredients

  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tbsp sugar
  • 1 1/2 tbsp applesauce
  • 1/2 cup old fashion oats
  • 1 tbsp wheat germ (You can always bump up the nutritional content by adding another tablespoon)
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 cup almond milk
  • 1 egg
  • 1 cup whole wheat flour
  • 1 green apple
  • Cinnamon
  • Maple Syrup

EGG-FREE: If you want to make this recipe egg-free, use 1 tbsp chia or flax seeds with 1/4 cup water. Let it sit by itself for about 10-15 minutes so that it becomes gelatinous. Add it into the recipe like you would the egg.

Directions

  1. Combine all ingredients except for the flour and apple. Poke the egg so that it can mix together.
  2. Add in the flour. Don’t over mix.
  3. Thinly slice the green apple. You can leave the skin on, but it will be harder to cut and eat after the pancakes are made.
  4. Heat a large skillet on medium high heat. If not using a non-stick skillet, add a small amount of oil to the bottom. Once the skillet is warm, turn down the heat to medium-low.
  5. Using a 1/3 cup measuring cup and pour batter into skillet. Top with the sliced apples. Once the batter is bubbling in the center you can flip the pancakes and cook for about another minute.
  6. Remove from skillet and continue with the rest of the batter. In a large skillet you should be able to make 3-4 pancakes at a time.
  7. When serving dust with cinnamon and drizzle with maple syrup.

Nutritional Information

Using an Egg, 1 Serving without Maple Syrup

301 calories | 5.5 g total fat | 1 g saturated fat | 64 mg cholesterol | 383 mg sodium | 51 g carbohydrates | 6.8 g fiber | 10.2 g sugar | 10.8 g protein

Using Chia “Egg”, 1 Serving without Maple Syrup

295 calories | 4.8 g total fat | 0.5 g saturated fat | 0 g cholesterol | 362 mg sodium | 53 g carbohydrates | 8.2 g fiber | 10.1 g sugar | 9.3 g protein

Macro Sources

70% Carbohydrates | 16% Fat | 14% Protein

Dietary Servings per Portion
  • 0.3 Fruit
  • 2.5 Grain
  • 0.2 Meat Alternative
  • 0.3 Milk Alternative